JETBeam T6 Flashlight Review

Preface
Official Specs
Versions
Price
Short Review
Long Review
  What's Included
  Manual and Packaging
  Build Quality and Durability
  Size
  Retention
  Power
  User Interface and Operation
  Modes
  LED and beam
  Tint vs...
  Beamshots, Runtime, etc table.
  Comparisons
Conclusion
  What I like
  What I don't like
Up Next
Notes

Preface

I’ve gotten a taste for bigger lights and even though this isn’t a new light, I was excited to get it from GearBest.  And I happen to typically like JETBeam lights, too.  So here’s the JETBeam T6!


Official Specs and Features

Versions

There seems to be just one version of this light.

Price

I believe this light was well North of $240 when it was released, but now it’s available for around $100.


Short Review

I’m very pleased with this light.  Over 700m of throw is pretty ridiculous, and on a light with a nice indicating side switch, even better!

Long Review

What’s Included

  • JETBeam T6
  • Lanyard
  • Spare o-ring
  • Manual and paperwork

20171225-IMG_8941.jpg

Package and Manual

The coloration is usual for JETBeam (red and blue) but the package itself is a bit unusual.  There’s a printed outer sleeve, and a rope pull.

The light is held in a foam cutout, which keeps things nice and secure.

The manual is quite good.  A long paper, printed on two sides; one English one Chinese.  Lots of feature info, lots of specs, etc.  A very full featured manual!

Build Quality and Disassembly

The build on this light is very good.  The outside looks fine of course (as all lights should) but the story is told by the threads, which are square cut, thick, and perfectly lubed.

The body has some nice appointments, which includes a tripod mount, and big cooling fins around much of the head.

The tailcap has three lanyard attachment points.  The bezel has ‘crenelations’ but just barely – fortunately not an “attack” bezel or anything.

As for disassembly…. yes the emitters are accessible (just ask u/zak) but generally, the tailcap unscrews for changing the cells.  The tailcap is directional, and has two posts that keep the proper contact points aligned with the proper cell terminals.

I would imagine removing the bezel requires a strap wrench or something, but it can be done.

Size

Officially it’s 163mm long by 88 mm wide (head).  This is a large light, but really, for 4 x 18650, and 700+ meters of throw, it’s not all that big.

Retention

There’s one main means to carry this light, and it’s a very well executed adjustable lanyard.  This lanyard connects at the head and tail – three points on the tail, and 5 points on the head are options.  The lanyard has a swivel bolt snap on both ends.

That’s all for carrying this light.  No pouch is included.

Power

The T6 runs on four 18650 cells.  The photo below shows flat button top 30q cells, but these were too short to make consistent contact, so I added a magnet to all 4 (two cells below have the magnets), and connection was good.  The light will not work in any configuration of 2 cells.  (That begs the question of why it worked a little when contact wasn’t great, but not at all when there was only two cells – the take home is to be sure you have good contact with all your cells.  I’d probably just recommend protected 18650s.

20171225-IMG_8968.jpg

The springs used are tall but if the cells aren’t long enough, bumps will still cause a disconnect.  Also see the posts that fit into the holes on the body.

20171225-IMG_8969.jpg

I performed two runtimes, the first one with cells making poor contact.  The voltage at the end was 4.14 on two cells and 2.95 on the other.  This isn’t a fault of the light, but a fault of the cells not connecting.  The second runtime, with magnets, displays longer output and also cells which discharged to the same voltage.

runtime.png

The manual doesn’t state it directly, but there seems to be no reverse polarity protection.  Note how the light will reset to turbo (at almost full turbo).

Also note that this runtime is in stark contrast to the prototype review by Zak.  in that review Turbo never stepped down, and the output was a gradual decline probably approximately tracking battery voltage.  It then seems as if JETBeam has added a timed stepdown, which starts at around 3.5 minutes (95%), and by 4 minutes is down to 35%.  That’s quite a heavy stepdown, but provided the temperature doesn’t get out of hand, the light should be able to be reset immediately back to near-turbo.

User Interface and Operation

The T6 operates from a side switch, which is actually two e-switches.  The manual describes these as the “lighting switch” (LS) (nearer the head) and the “warning switch” (WS) (nearer the logo).

20171225-IMG_8959.jpg

The UI here is fine.  I love that there’s one button access to Turbo and Low.

State Action Result
 Off Click LS (or WS) No action
 Off Hold LS Mode memory
 Off Hold WS Strobe
 On Click LS Mode cycle (H>L direction)
 Any Double click LS Turbo
 Any Double click WS Low
 Strobe group Click WS Strobe cycle (Strobe>SOS>Beacon)*

* Manual is wrong here, it’s Strobe SOS Beacon not SOS Strobe Beacon

The switch is also an indicating switch.  Here’s what the manual says for power indication:

Over 20%: No indicator.
Between 10-20%: Slow blink.
Less than 10%: Quick blink.

Modes

Mode Mode Claimed Output (lm) Claimed Runtime Mode Measured Lux Tailcap Amps
Turbo 4350 1.8h 30900 3.07
 High 1500 4.5h  10180 0.66
 Middle 350 21h 2090 0.10
 Low 30 300h 78

(Remember this is at nominal 7.2V, so really 21W on Turbo.)

LED and Beam

Cree XP-L emitters are in this light, times four.  These are the HD variety, and though the HI version might be better for throw, this light throws quite well.  The reflectors for each of the four emitters are smooth, and very well executed.

20171225-IMG_8954.jpg

20171225-IMG_8970.jpg

I’m not entirely sure why XP-L HI wasn’t chosen.  That’s one of my favorite emitters if I’m quite honest, and this light would be fantastic with those emitters.

20171225-IMG_8973.jpg

The beam at close range does exhibit a beam pattern showing four emitters.  At range this pattern can be seen in the opposite way – the beam converges well but there’s a distinctive spill pattern of four emitters.  Some users might be bothered by this.  I am not one of those users.

Tint vs BLF-348

20171231-IMG_9262.jpg

Beamshots, Runtime, and Lux Measurements

JETBeam T6
Emitter Cree XP-L HD
Emitter Notes
Cell 18650×4
Glamour Shots Beamshots [0.3″, f/8, ISO 100, 5000k]
Runtime 18650×4
Chargetime
LVP? Flash, Side Switch Warning
Claimed Lumens (lm) 4350
Lux (Measured) 4100 lux @ 5.751 m
Candela (Calculated) in cd 135603.4
Throw (Calculated) (m) 736.5
Throw (Claimed) (m) 750

 

Random Comparisons and Competitive Options….

Thrunite has the TN40S, which is comparable but with XP-L HI emitters, and similar throw.  There are many other single emitter lights in a similar format and with similar throw.

Conclusion

What I like

  • Size and build
  • Easy access to bookend modes
  • Lanyard is cool, and easy to attach and detach
  • It’s just a cool light!

What I don’t like

  • Strobe is too easy to get to
  • Would rather XP-L HI emitters

Up Next

I believe I’ll have two more flashlight reviews this week, at least one of those being a Nitecore.  Aiming for MWF flashlight reviews – how do you guys like schedules?  Thursday may be my non-light day and maybe Tuesday for light-related things?  Just thinking out loud.

Notes

  • This light was provided by GearBest for review. I was not paid to write this review.
  • This content originally appeared at zeroair.wordpress.com.  Please visit there for the best experience!
  • Whether or not I have a coupon for this light, I do have a bunch of coupons!!  Have a look at my spreadsheet for those coupons.  Note I’ve upgraded that sheet so that now, you may subscribe and get notifications when the sheet is edited!!

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